Infovore

Infovore

A friend once described me as an “Eater of Books” in the rate at which I consumed them… Mitch Joel has the right of it when talking about Infovores,  which is another way I’d describe myself The good Personally, I have a hard time watching a dance competition on TV knowing full-well that iTunes U is stuffed to the digital rafters with audio and video Podcasts from some of the leading universities and given by the best professors… and that’s just one, small channel. And the less good The other side of the challenge is that there is simply not enough time to follow, consume and deeply ingest everything. You will never be able to read every e-newsletter, Blog post, tweet or listen/watch every Podcast or interesting YouTube video. As an Infovore, I’ve become quite comfortable with a diet that consists of both grazing and then taking the time to really enjoy a full and hearty meal (I tried to read one book every week). The mightiest of Infovore’s embrace the “mark all as read” button and take refuge in knowing that it’s not about consuming everything....
An almost advent moment of serendipity

An almost advent moment of serendipity

Found in one of those moments of serendipity that makes you smile. Thanks to an almost 5 year old email from Ciarán Ó’Gaora Reading I’m reminded of John Fanning‘s advice to read less business tomes and more fiction and poetry. Advent Patrick Kavanagh We have tested and tasted too much, lover- Through a chink too wide there comes in no wonder. But here in the Advent-darkened room Where the dry black bread and the sugarless tea Of penance will charm back the luxury Of a child’s soul, we’ll return to Doom The knowledge we stole but could not use. And the newness that was in every stale thing When we looked at it as children: the spirit-shocking Wonder in a black slanting Ulster hill Or the prophetic astonishment in the tedious talking Of an old fool will awake for us and bring You and me to the yard gate to watch the whins And the bog-holes, cart-tracks, old stables where Time begins. O after Christmas we’ll have no need to go searching For the difference that sets an old phrase burning- We’ll hear it in the whispered argument of a churning Or in the streets where the village boys are lurching. And we’ll hear it among decent men too Who barrow dung in gardens under trees, Wherever life pours ordinary plenty. Won’t we be rich, my love and I, and God we shall not ask for reason’s payment, The why of heart-breaking strangeness in dreeping hedges Nor analyse God’s breath in common statement. We have thrown into the dust-bin the clay-minted wages Of pleasure, knowledge and the conscious hour- And Christ...
Quote of the day

Quote of the day

In praise of better questions “The uncreative mind can spot wrong answers, but it takes a very creative mind to spot wrong questions.” Anthony Jay   Image Caroline on...
Looking up with a sense of wonder and curiosity

Looking up with a sense of wonder and curiosity

I grew up with a sense of wonder and curiousity. Carl Sagan, Issac Asimov and Nicholas Casey helped imbued me with a love of science. The third person was an amazing Science and Physics teacher. Oscar Wilde said “We are all in the gutter but some of us are looking at the stars” And Sean O’Casey wrote Boyle: An’, as it blowed an’ blowed, I ofen looked up at the sky an’ assed meself the question — what is the stars, what is the stars? … Joxer: Ah, that’s the question, that’s the question — what is the stars? Boyle: An’ then, I’d have another look, an’ I’d ass meself — what is the moon? Joxer: Ah, that’s the question — what is the moon, what is the moon? Over a decade ago a group of scientists asked similar questions and following their curiosity did something to find out the answers. Today a tiny probe sent 500 million kilometers finished a 10 year journey and in a monumental step for our species landed on a comet. It is a truly wonderful day for science and for wonder. Today instead of looking down the human race looked up. As a species we need to choose wonder, choose science and hope, choose courage and...

God is in the gaps

An almost remembered quote. The important things are to be found in the gaps between things. The intersections, the connections, the paradoxes, the metaphors. A quote from Before Sunset underlines this and whole notion of shared understanding Celine: I believe if there’s any kind of God it wouldn’t be in any of us, not you or me but just this little space in between. If there’s any kind of magic in this world it must be in the attempt of understanding someone sharing something. I know, it’s almost impossible to succeed but who cares really? The answer must be in the...